Create leaderboards using spreadsheets

A leaderboard consists of a ranked list of items each with a label and optionally a value.

This example Leaderboard could be representing a sales team and their respective sales over a month's time.

The value associated with each label can be formatted to either numeric or decimal with decimal as the default.

The GIF below gives a demo of the following steps.

  1. Click in the Labels field and either type in a cell selection (e.g. A1:A17), click and drag over the desired cells, or click to select an entire column or row in the Spreadsheet Data area. As you do this, the cells will highlight and you’ll see a live preview of your Leaderboard.

  2. Click in the Values field and either type in a cell selection (e.g. B1:B17) or click and drag over the desired cells in the Spreadsheet Data area.

  3. Give your widget a title.

  4. Change the widget size from the default (1x2) to the appropriate size for your Leaderboard.

  5. When you’re happy with your Leaderboard, click the green Add to dashboard button from the bottom of the screen.

Is it possible to create a table or have more than 2 columns in a Leaderboard?

We don't have a pre-built solution for this yet, but there's a neat workaround you can use to extend our Spreadsheets Leaderboard widgets. This workaround allows for displaying slightly more info by using a formula called CONCATENATE in Google Sheets (reference) or Excel (reference) to join the values in separate cells. 

Let's look at an example:

You can see in column A there is the Fruit heading, in column C the Assigned heading, and in column E the Amount heading. In column D is the formula that glues together the specified cells.

The concatenate formula takes a list of cells and glues them together into one result. Because gluing together for example A1 'Fruit' and C1 'Assigned' would result in 'FruitAssigned', here we have added a separator column B, which holds ' - ' (space dash space).  

Also worth noting here is that while this example uses just two columns (adding one extra) it could be extended to as many as you'd like, such as =concatenate(A1, B1, C1, D1, E1) and so on.

Thus the full formula in e.g. D1 is =concatenate(A1, B1, C1) which creates 'Fruit - Assigned'. 

Here you can use any value for a separator and you can also specify it in the concatenate function itself, such as =concatenate(A1, " - ", C1)

Here's how to add this to our dashboard:

First, choose the Spreadsheets integration. We've created this in Google Sheets, so then choose the Google Sheets/Drive source and find the file we created. Then select the Leaderboard visualization (from the top right corner of the configuration).

For the Labels of the widget I select the whole of column D by clicking on the D column label, and for the values I select the whole of column E by clicking on the E column label.

This is the result on our dashboard:

More ways to visualize your spreadsheets

Now that you’re familiar with how to create leaderboards, read our dedicated guides to creating the different visualizations available.

  • Line Chart
    Plot multiple series of values and visualize these trends over a period.

  • Column Chart
    Plot a series of data as vertical columns, with the option for individual labels for each column and a goal field, which can be set to highlight values above a specific target.

  • Bar Chart
    Plots a series of data in a horizontal bar chart, with the option for individual labels for each column and a goal field, which can be set to highlight values above a specific target.

  • Number Widget
    Consists of a single number pulled from a specified cell. Enables you to visually compare two figures with 4 comparison visualizations:

    • Sparkline
      Displays a primary metric with a sparkline (a small line chart) below it.

    • Percentage
      Displays a primary metric with a percentage change value below it that compares the primary metric with a secondary number.

    • Number
      Displays a primary metric with a value change below it that is a calculation of the difference between the the primary metric and a secondary number.

    • Goal
      Displays a primary metric with a goal change below it that is a calculation of the difference between the the primary metric and a secondary number.

  • Geck-O-Meter
    A gauge visualization to quickly see a metric in comparison to defined minimum and maximum values.

  • Text
    Displays non-numerical data from a cell, or multiple cells, in a spreadsheet.

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